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Isometry of the ensemble
Isometry of the ensemble

Ground floor and first floor
Ground floor and first floor

Model of the ensemble
Model of the ensemble

View from north and view from east
View from north and view from east

Model of the dormitory
Model of the dormitory

Chapel
Chapel

Dormitory
Dormitory




PROJECTINDEX
 
HAUS DER STILLE
Technische Universität Berlin
ARCHITECTURE

Structures grafted onto convent ruins
The former Cistercian convent in Lindow, just an hour north of Berlin, is located between two lakes and a mystical forest. Today the convent lies as a ruined ensemble at different stages of decay, surrounded by a few buildings from different eras. The project proposes to utilize the ruin's core structural features: durability and atmospheric density. Within this setting, we would like to propose a Haus der Stille (House of Silence). This is a place where anyone who seeks a temporary reprieve from his or her daily life can discover the possibility to find balance and mindfulness in self-chosen silence. Set in an idyllic and calm landscape, two new structures are inserted carefully into the ensemble: The Dormitory, containing both the sleeping rooms and common areas, and the Chapel, the sacred room of contemplation. Both volumes are developed according to a suburban scale that respects the old ruins. They amend the exiting ensemble harmonically. The delicate task of implementing new structures within this context makes the building construction and its resulting appearance a crucial topic. To strengthen the locality and its spirit, the whole structure is set on rammed earth. The material can be found within the building site and therefore creates a strong link between the site and building. The new building sits atop the ruined structure, symbiotically making use of existing windows and walls, and at the same time strengthening the ruined structure. The main historic views of the ensemble are preserved and new harmonious views are created. The acoustic and climatical qualities of massive rammed earth walls, their rough and warm, haptic character reflect the building's purpose precisely: silence, modesty and durability with minimum impact on the historic ruins and environment.